Why Isnt My Adobe Photoshop Download Opening On Mac

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Earlier in the week, Apple released macOS Catalina. But if you’re using Photoshop or Lightroom CC on your Mac, you may want to put the upgrade on hold. Adobe users have reported numerous problems with Photoshop and Lightroom after upgrading the system. And Adobe itself has confirmed that these two programs still aren’t compatible with the latest macOS.

Adobe Photoshop Elements 2021 is photo editing software used by anyone who wants to edit and create with their photos. It offers easy ways to get started; effortless organisation; step-by-step guidance for editing; and fun ways to make and share stunning photo creations, effects, prints and gifts. The easiest way to get Adobe Photoshop for free, and maintain its full capabilities is a trial version. It is not permanent and lasts only 7 days after the registration. There are three more ways to use this software free longer ‒ to download its latest Photoshop CS2 version, simplified Photoshop Elements version or mobile Photoshop Express app.

Adobe pointed out on Help pages of both Photoshop and Lightroom that these two pieces of software don’t work well with macOS 10.15 (Catalina) just yet. In other words, you can use them, but they have a range of compatibility issues.

Lightroom Classic 8.4.1 can’t detect Nikon cameras when the camera is turned on after invoking the “Start Tether Capture…” command. There is a workaround though: you can turn the camera on first, and then select File > Tethered Capture > Start Tether Capture. Adobe notes that it’s working with Nikon to correct this problem.

  1. Welcome to Photoshop! Whether you purchased a Complete, a Photography, or a Single-App plan, the process is the same. Simply download Photoshop from the Creative Cloud website and install it on your desktop.
  2. After we updated to Mojave in 2018 we experienced problems running Photoshop CS5 on our Mac. Luckily we were able to solve the issue in Mojave, but we aren't expecting the same fix to work in.
  3. I've just purchased $400 worth of Photoshop actions and the Photoshop Elements 12 that I have will not launch on my computer. I open pse 12 and it asks me to enter my adobe id and password. When I type it in, the screen goes dark and it will not load. I just spent 3 hours chatting with an Adobe employee who couldn't help.

When it comes to Photoshop, there are more issues users are facing. Photoshop 20.0.6 and later versions work with macOS Catalina, but with a number of hiccups. As for legacy/perpetual versions of Photoshop, Adobe writes that they are “not supported in any way for use on macOS Catalina.”

If you use Photoshop 20.0.6 and later and upgrade your system, here are the issues you might expect:

  • File naming options don’t work correctly in the Save As dialog: when you change the file format, it doesn’t change the extension of the file in the name field. Also, when you check “as a copy,” “copy” isn’t added to the file name. If you’ve upgraded the system, you can work around this problem and add the name extensions manually.
  • Plug-ins not found or cannot be verified: Adobe explains that, in macOS Catalina, plug-ins that are quarantined will return a Photoshop error that “the file was not found.” Alternatively, you’ll see an OS error that says that the plug-in “can’t be opened because its integrity cannot be verified.”

“Customers that have plug-ins already installed and then update to macOS 10.15 should not see this issue,” Adobe writes. “Customers that upgrade to macOS 10.15 and then try to download and install a plug-in may see failures.”

  • Render Video starts but never completes: When you select File > Export > Render Video… the process never completes.
  • Droplets don’t work: they launch but don’t run
  • Apple color picker causes a crash: If you select Preferences > General… and set Color Picker to “Apple,” the second time you open the color picker, Photoshop will crash.
  • ExtendScript Toolkit does not run
  • Lens Profile Creator does not run

If you still haven’t upgraded your system to macOS Catalina –good, wait a bit more until the issues are resolved. And if you have, there are workarounds to some of the issues you are experiencing. You can read more about the issues and their possible solutions on Adobe’s website:

[via Creative Bloq]

Learn how to make Adobe Photoshop your default image viewer and editor for popular file formats like JPEG, PNG and TIFF, as well as Photoshop's own PSD format, in Mac OS X.

Even though every copy of Photoshop, whether it's a standalone version or part of a Creative Cloud subscription, includes a free and powerful file management program called Adobe Bridge, many Mac users still prefer the Finder for locating and opening their images.

While there's nothing technically wrong with that, there is one annoying problem; Mac OS X, at least by default, ignores Photoshop when we open images directly from within a Finder window. Instead, it prefers to open them in Apple's own Preview app with its basic and very limited set of image editing features. Since Photoshop is obviously our editor of choice, let's learn how to easily configure Mac OS X so that our images will automatically open for us in Photoshop every time.

Note that this tutorial is specifically for Mac users. For the PC version, see Make Photoshop Your Default Image Editor in Windows 10.

This is lesson 2 of 10 in Chapter 2 - Opening Images into Photoshop.

Turning On File Name Extensions

First, navigate to a folder on your Mac that contains one or more images. Here, I've opened a folder that's sitting on my Desktop. Inside the folder are four image files. Starting from the left, we have a PNG file, a JPEG file, a Photoshop PSD file, and a TIFF file. How do we know which file type we're looking at? We know because of the three letter extension at the end of each name:

A Finder window showing four image files.

If you're not seeing the extensions at the end of your file names, go up to the Finder menu in the top left of your screen and choose Preferences:

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This opens the Finder Preferences dialog box. Click the Advanced tab at the top, then select Show all filename extensions by clicking inside its checkbox. Close the dialog box when you're done. You should now see the file extensions listed at the end of your file names:

Click the Advanced tab, then check 'Show all filename extensions'.

The Default Image Viewer

Let's try opening one of the images to see what happens. I'll double-click on my JPEG image ('fashion.jpg') to open it:

Opening a photo by double-clicking on its thumbnail.

Even though I have the latest version of Photoshop installed, and even though Photoshop just happens to be the world's most powerful image editor, Mac OS X completely ignores it and instead opens my photo in its own Preview app (fashion photo from Adobe Stock):

Preview has a few image editing features, but it's no Photoshop.

That's obviously not what I wanted so I'll close out of the Preview app by going up to the Preview menu at the top of the screen and choosing Quit Preview:

Making Photoshop The Default Image Viewer And Editor

So how do we tell Mac OS X to open this image in Photoshop instead of in Preview? And more importantly, how to we tell it to use Photoshop not just for this one image this one time but for every JPEG image we open in the future? It's actually very easy to do. First, Control-click on a JPEG image you want to open:

Control-clicking on the JPEG photo's thumbnail.

Then choose Get Info from the menu that appears:

A long, narrow Info dialog box will open full of details about the image. Look for the section that says Open with. You may need to click the small arrow to the left of the section's name to twirl it open. This section tells us which program Mac OS X is currently using to open JPEG files. By default, it's set to Preview:

Preview is currently our default image editor.

Click on 'Preview.app' to open a list of other apps currently installed on your system and choose Adobe Photoshop from the list. If you have more than one version of Photoshop installed, choose the most recent version. Again, at the time I'm writing this, the most recent version is CC 2015.5:

There's just one step remaining. To set Photoshop as the new default app for opening all JPEG files, not just this one, click the Change All button:

Clicking 'Change All'.

You'll be asked if you're sure you want to open all JPEG files (that is, all files with a '.jpg' extension) with Photoshop. Click Continue to confirm it:

You can close out of the Info dialog box at this point, and that's all there is to it! Photoshop is now set to open all of your JPEG files. I'll double-click once again on my JPEG image in the Finder window:

Opening the same photo again.

And sure enough, instead of opening in the Preview app as it did before, this time the photo opens for me in my latest version of Photoshop:

Photoshop is now my default image editor for JPEG files.

PNG Files

So far, so good. We've set Photoshop as the default app for opening JPEG files. But we still need to set Photoshop as the default app for opening the other file types as well, so let's run through the steps quickly. I'll return to my Finder window, then I'll Control-click on my PNG file ('butterfly.png') and choose Get Info from the menu:

Control-clicking on the PNG file and choosing 'Get Info'.
Mac

This opens the Info dialog box where we see that Preview, not Photoshop, is currently set as the default app for opening PNG files:

I'll click on 'Preview.app' and select my latest version of Photoshop from the list. Then, to set Photoshop as the default app for all PNG files, I'll click Change All:

Changing 'Open with' to Photoshop, then clicking 'Change All'.

I'll confirm that I want all PNG files to open in Photoshop by clicking Continue:

Then I'll close out of the Info dialog box. And now, when I open my PNG file from my Finder window by double-clicking on its thumbnail, the image opens in Photoshop, as will all PNG files from now on (butterfly design from Adobe Stock):

The PNG file opens in Photoshop. Image credit: Adobe Stock.

TIFF Files

Let's do the same thing for TIFF files. I'll return once again to my Finder window where I'll Control-click on my TIFF image ('portrait.tif'). Then, I'll choose Get Info from the menu:

Control-clicking on the TIFF file and choosing 'Get Info'.

In the Info dialog box, we see that just like with the JPEG and PNG files, Mac OS X is using Preview to open TIFF files. It's possible that your system may have a different app selected so don't worry if it does. All that matters is that we change it to Photoshop:

I'll once again click on 'Preview.app' and select my latest version of Photoshop from the list. Then I'll make the change apply to all TIFF files by clicking Change All:

Changing 'Open with' to Photoshop, then clicking 'Change All', this time for TIFF files.

I'll click Continue to confirm the change:

Then I'll close out of the Info dialog box. And now when I double-click on my TIFF file to open it in the Finder window, we see that it opens automatically in Photoshop (portrait photo from Adobe Stock):

The TIFF file opens in Photoshop. Image credit: Adobe Stock.

PSD Files

Finally, while Mac OS X will usually set Photoshop as the default app for opening PSD files (since PSD is Photoshop’s native file format), it still never hurts to check. Plus, if you have multiple versions of Photoshop installed on your computer, it’s worth making sure that your PSD files will open in the newest version, as we're about to see.

I'll return one last time to my Finder window where I'll Control-click on my PSD file ('performer.psd') and choose Get Info:

Control-clicking on the PSD file and choosing 'Get Info'.

In the Info dialog box, we see that sure enough, Mac OS X is using Photoshop to open PSD files. But, there's a problem. I still have older versions of Photoshop installed on my system, and Mac OS X has chosen one of the older versions, not the newest version. Here we see that it's set to use Photoshop CC 2014, while the newest version (at the time I'm writing this) is CC 2015.5:

Photoshop is set to open PSD files, but it's the wrong version of Photoshop.

I'll click on 'Adobe Photoshop CC 2014.app' and choose the latest version of Photoshop from the list:

Why Isnt My Adobe Photoshop Download Opening On Mac

Then, as I've done with the other file types, I'll make the change apply to all PSD files by clicking Change All:

Clicking 'Change All'.

I'll click Continue to confirm the change:

Then I'll close out of the Info dialog box. And now when I double-click on my PSD file in the Finder window, it opens automatically in my latest version of Photoshop (performer photo from Adobe Stock):

The PSD file opens in Photoshop. Image credit: Adobe Stock.

Where to go next...

And there we have it! That's how to make Photoshop your default image editor in Mac OS X! If you're also a Windows user, learn how to make Photoshop your default image editor in Windows 10.

In the next lesson in this chapter, we'll learn how to create a new document in Photoshop using the redesigned New Document dialog box!

Or check out any of the other lessons in this chapter:

  • 02. Make Photoshop your default image editor in Mac OS X

For more chapters and for our latest tutorials, visit our Photoshop Basics section!

Get all of our Photoshop tutorials as PDFs! Download them today!

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